ANSYS Student Version Released – Free Download

ANSYS student versionI have some very exciting news to share with you. Today we announced the immediate availability of the free of charge ANSYS Student product. Yes, you read that correctly! We’ve actually made our student product  version available free of charge, globally! It can be downloaded here, go and check it out!

Here’s a high level  summary of the ANSYS Student product: Continue reading

ANSYS Campus-Wide Solution Expected to Spur FIU Research Output

ANSYS team during the signing ceremony at FIURecently an ANSYS team was invited to attend a signing ceremony at Florida International University (FIU). The signing ceremony was to formalize ANSYS’ donation of a campus-wide license to FIU and to recognize the generous contribution.

The visiting team included Sin Min Yap, Vice President, Bob Helsby from the ANSYS Academic Program and Ryan Bobryk, Account Manager at ANSYS. They first toured the FlU campus visiting various research labs and departments. The team returned overawed with the fascinating research projects at FIU and shared their excitement with colleagues at ANSYS. Continue reading

Aircraft Cabin Airflow: Curbing Disease Spread

For me, science and engineering has always been about designing solutions to the various problems in our everyday lives. When I began doing research in seventh grade, my very first project was a roof that converted the impact energy of precipitation into electricity to help power the home. The following year, I came up with a dynamically supportive knee brace that implements smart fluids to vary the amount of support that patients received, depending on the physical activity. Last year, I created a self-cleaning outdoor garbage bin to tackle the issue of urban sanitation in our neighborhoods.

raymond wang intel science fair winnerYet perhaps, I am best known for my most recent project, which won the 2015 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair, out of 1,700 students nationally selected from 75+ countries. This year, I tackled the issue of airborne pathogen spread in aircraft cabins, generating the industry’s first high fidelity simulations of airflow inside airplane cabins. Using my insights, I engineered economically feasible solutions that altered cabin airflow patterns, creating personalized breathing zones for each individual passenger to effectively curb pathogen inhalation by up to 55 times and improve fresh air inhalation by more than 190%. Continue reading

Using ANSYS CFD to Analyze High-Lift Wing Design

Agastya ParikhFour years ago, as a high school sophomore, I began work on an independent project that explored ways to improve the performance of high-lift systems used on the Airbus A330-300. One of the biggest challenges facing me was how to best conduct experiments to assess the performance of the different designs. In prior years, I had conducted simple research on aircraft wing design and aeroelasticity using unpowered balsa models of the aircraft being tested. To employ this same method would be unworkable for the relatively complex systems of flaps and slats required by the Airbus aircraft. I would have needed to build a larger scale model or perform wind-tunnel testing — neither of which was viable because I did not have access to equipment of the complexity required. Continue reading

Ready-to-Use ANSYS Tutorials Available for Professors

AcademicProgramThere is a quote often attributed to Albert Einstein that I am very fond of.

In theory, theory and practice are the same. In practice, they are not.

In my humble opinion, they are complementary. I have seen many great classes and books teaching the theory of CFD and FEA — how to discretize the governing equations, the difference between different numerical schemes, implicit vs. explicit formulations, etc. But when engineers are trained, we need to make sure we also give them the tools and tutorials to put the theory to work and help them practice how to use CFD and FEA to develop better products, solve complex challenges.

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Bringing Systems Engineering to Universities

systems engineering academic blogWith the increase of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs, or drones) in the skies, the rapid rise of robotics, and the development of embedded technologies and autonomous smart systems for the Internet of Things, small teams of engineers face bigger and bigger challenges. While it was once enough to be an expert in a single type of physics, these complex, interacting systems require modern engineers to have more knowledge of multiphysics, model-based systems engineering and embedded software than their predecessors.

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4th Grade Coding – Hooking Kids on STEM

My 4th grade son participated in an after school Code Club this school year. It was an excellent introduction to coding and STEM. During the Club, kids use Scratch from MIT to create animations and games that they later showcased to their parents. Mrs. Pollard leads the code club and writes her own blog about it. There were 2 rounds of Code Club this school year, with about 20 kids in each session and with ½ being girls. Continue reading

Wall of Wind (WOW) at Florida International University Helps Mitigate Hurricane Damage

wall of windIn coastal areas, hurricanes can severely damage buildings, people and cause a lot of havoc. Therefore, scientists at Florida International University (FIU) are studying hurricanes and how their effects can be mitigated using the Wall of Wind (WOW). WOW is a research facility developed by FIU’s International Hurricanes Research Center (IHRC), Miami, Florida. Continue reading

University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering Student Design Expo Today

The Swanson School of Engineering — located in the Oakland section of Pittsburgh, a short four miles from the downtown — is having its first Student Design EXPO today, Thursday, December 4, from 6:00 to 8:30 in Alumni Hall. This first EXPO has a unique focus on sustainability —DSC_0126 each of the 71 projects must include a sustainability component as this is the “Year of Sustainability” at the University of Pittsburgh.

The Swanson School has an obvious strong relationship to ANSYS. John Swanson, ANSYS’s founder received his PhD from us. On December 5, 2007, John presented the University of Pittsburgh with a most generous gift and we became the Swanson School of Engineering. John is a frequent visitor to the Swanson School and is currently mentoring several student projects focused on harvesting and using solar energy, a current passion of his. Continue reading

Lebanese Students Overcome Many Challenges to Build an Unmanned Aircraft

image of Lebanese American University Airplane LAU Solix

Lebanese American University Airplane LAU Solix

The Lebanese American University (LAU) challenged its students to design an unmanned aircraft capable of long flights at high altitudes. Our LAU Solix Team, comprised of eight mechanical engineering students, is very familiar with ANSYS tools and is skilled at handling CFD and fluid–structure interaction (FSI) simulations so we put these tools to work on our unmanned aircraft design. The team had to deal with the interaction that happens between fluid and structure that occurs in a wide range of engineering problems — especially in aircraft design. Continue reading