Submodeling: Simple Solutions for Large-Scale Problems

If you’re an engineer who has dealt with large simulation models, you know there’s often a trade-off between accuracy and solution time. Submodeling is a technique you can use to reduce solution time without sacrificing accuracy of results.

A common strategy you can use to look at the overall behavior of an assembly or complex part of a large model is to simplify the model during preparation by removing small details, like fillets and holes. Simplifying models in this way can have a significant impact on run times. This simplification, while not excessively affecting overall model stiffness, may result in lower resolution of localized stresses. What you need, then, is a mechanism that allows you to “zoom in” on these details to examine behavior around specific areas.

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ANSYS Videos on the ANSYS How To Channel

ansys you tubeOver the past year and a half, our team has been creating a large number of technical ANSYS videos that focus on a variety of areas. From ANSYS Electronics to ANSYS CFX, ANSYS Fluent to ANSYS Mechanical, ANSYS SCADE, and even ANSYS Student tips for those just getting started in the art of engineering simulation.

Today, I’d like to share a few of the examples you’ll find before I send you off to explore on your own. Continue reading

How to Make Knowledge Capture an Integrated Part of the Simulation Process

image007Being a CAE analyst for almost 20 years has been an interesting journey. Looking back to see the huge development in computer power and the development of the simulation software, in terms of supported physics, features and ease of use, is very pleasing. The turnaround time for a typical simulation has been reduced from months to days. However, there is one part of the process that has not changed, and not gotten the same speed up; namely reporting. Continue reading

MATLAB Apps For ANSYS Products: Updated for ANSYS 17.0

In 2013, I wrote a blog showing ANSYS users how to make MATLAB apps for ANSYS Fluent. Just as a quick reminder, a friend of mine, who is also an ANSYS Fluent and Mechanical APDL user has a Windows Matlab code programming a Linux Fluent session. She had just updated her hardware. Everything is moved to Linux. She also needed to integrate a Mechanical APDL session.

She was asking me: “Why, can’t I port my MATLAB®  code running on the platform of my choice and be able to also connect to Mechanical APDL?” She challenged me to to create a less than 20 lines code example. Back in 2013, my example was for ANSYS 16.0. Here is my update for ANSYS 17.0. Continue reading

Bring Your Easy Simulations to Life in ANSYS AIM

ANSYS AIM brings easy simulation to every engineer. The results from these simulations can be used to create fantastic images that bring your simulation to life.

You may have noticed a new graphics display mode that can be enabled by clicking on one of the toolbar buttons in ANSYS AIM 17.0. Its name is Enhanced display, and it is the third display mode option after Standard and Translucent displays: Continue reading

Cloud Computing Best Practices for Engineering Simulation Pt.2

In the first part of this two-part post, I already addressed four of the eight cloud computing best practices that are fundamentally related to simulation data and end-user access. Now I’ll address best practices that are associated with licensing, HPC workloads, and business support for cloud deployments. Continue reading

Cloud Computing Best Practices for Engineering Simulation

cloud computing engineering simulation best practicesRapid growth in the use of engineering simulation tools – and in the demand for high performance computing (HPC) – is driving interest in cloud computing. Using the cloud for simulation presents unique challenges with different solution types required for specific use-cases. For many years, I have been on this journey with customers adopting cloud computing. Quite a few of them has been enabled through the UberCloud project. Let me share some lessons learned and key takeaways. I will basically do that by means of eight “best practices”: Continue reading

Constitutive Modeling of 3D Printed FDM Parts: Part 2 (Approaches)

In part 1 of this two-part post, I reviewed the challenges in the constitutive modeling of 3D printed parts using the Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) process. In this second part, I discuss some of the approaches that may be used to enable analyses of FDM parts even in presence of these challenges. I present them below in increasing order of the detail captured by the model. Continue reading

Constitutive Modeling of 3D Printed FDM Parts: Part 1 (Challenges)

Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) is increasingly being used to make functional plastic parts in the aerospace industry and this trend is expected to continue and grow in other industries as well. All functional parts have an expected performance that they must sustain during their lifetime. Ensuring this performance is attained is crucial for aerospace components, but important in all applications. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) is an important predictor of part performance in a wide range of industries, but this is not straightforward for the simulation of FDM parts due to difficulties in accurately representing the material behavior in a constitutive model. In part 1 of this article, I list some of the challenges in the development of constitutive models for FDM parts. In part 2, I will discuss possible approaches to addressing these challenges while developing constitutive models that offer some value to the analyst. Continue reading

Mesh Creation for Large Fabricated Structure Analysis

FEA meshed ship hull structural analysis

Many structural analysis models that use shell elements consist of a large number of bodies that need to be connected together to create a valid analysis model. These structures are typically manufactured by welding, for example ship structures.

There are a number of methods that can be used in ANSYS Mechanical for creating this type of model, which requires the geometry to be meshed and connected. Continue reading