Bring Your Easy Simulations to Life in ANSYS AIM

ANSYS AIM brings easy simulation to every engineer. The results from these simulations can be used to create fantastic images that bring your simulation to life.

You may have noticed a new graphics display mode that can be enabled by clicking on one of the toolbar buttons in ANSYS AIM 17.0. Its name is Enhanced display, and it is the third display mode option after Standard and Translucent displays: Continue reading

Cloud Computing Best Practices for Engineering Simulation Pt.2

In the first part of this two-part post, I already addressed four of the eight cloud computing best practices that are fundamentally related to simulation data and end-user access. Now I’ll address best practices that are associated with licensing, HPC workloads, and business support for cloud deployments. Continue reading

Cloud Computing Best Practices for Engineering Simulation

cloud computing engineering simulation best practicesRapid growth in the use of engineering simulation tools – and in the demand for high performance computing (HPC) – is driving interest in cloud computing. Using the cloud for simulation presents unique challenges with different solution types required for specific use-cases. For many years, I have been on this journey with customers adopting cloud computing. Quite a few of them has been enabled through the UberCloud project. Let me share some lessons learned and key takeaways. I will basically do that by means of eight “best practices”: Continue reading

Constitutive Modeling of 3D Printed FDM Parts: Part 2 (Approaches)

In part 1 of this two-part post, I reviewed the challenges in the constitutive modeling of 3D printed parts using the Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) process. In this second part, I discuss some of the approaches that may be used to enable analyses of FDM parts even in presence of these challenges. I present them below in increasing order of the detail captured by the model. Continue reading

Constitutive Modeling of 3D Printed FDM Parts: Part 1 (Challenges)

Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) is increasingly being used to make functional plastic parts in the aerospace industry and this trend is expected to continue and grow in other industries as well. All functional parts have an expected performance that they must sustain during their lifetime. Ensuring this performance is attained is crucial for aerospace components, but important in all applications. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) is an important predictor of part performance in a wide range of industries, but this is not straightforward for the simulation of FDM parts due to difficulties in accurately representing the material behavior in a constitutive model. In part 1 of this article, I list some of the challenges in the development of constitutive models for FDM parts. In part 2, I will discuss possible approaches to addressing these challenges while developing constitutive models that offer some value to the analyst. Continue reading

Mesh Creation for Large Fabricated Structure Analysis

FEA meshed ship hull structural analysis

Many structural analysis models that use shell elements consist of a large number of bodies that need to be connected together to create a valid analysis model. These structures are typically manufactured by welding, for example ship structures.

There are a number of methods that can be used in ANSYS Mechanical for creating this type of model, which requires the geometry to be meshed and connected. Continue reading

5 Improved Workflows for Rotating Machinery Design and Analysis

There were a number of new and exciting workflow enhancements included in ANSYS 16.0 for those who design and analyze rotating machinery to make data transfers and simulation setup easier. Here are the top five enhancements:

1 – BladeGen to BladeEditor

BladeGen Continue reading

Taking Laminar-Turbulent Transition Modeling to the Next Level

Flows around aerodynamic bodies, like aircraft wings, helicopter blades, wind turbines and turbomachinery components develop boundary layers that, to a large extent, define their performance. The boundary layers can either be laminar or turbulent depending on numerous factors, like Reynolds number, freestream turbulence levels and surface roughness, to name a few. Understanding which type of boundary layer is present, and the location of the laminar-to-turbulent transition point under varying operating conditions, is essential for accurate predictions of the performance of aerodynamic devices. Continue reading

Advanced Electric Machine Design with Electromagnetic and CFD Simulations

You may have read a quick blog post at Desktop Engineering about ANSYS’s electric machine simulation capabilities. Here we dive into the technical aspects and implications of thermal simulation for electric machines.

Electric machine geometry with cooling and integrated power electronics.

Electric machine geometry with cooling and integrated power electronics.

Modern electric machines are designed to meet a wide range of applications, all facing a variety of different technical challenges. They are designed to be compact with high power densities, to have integrated power electronics, to be high-speed for higher power density, and to handle harsh environments.

These challenges all have thermal implications that affect the lifetime and performance of the electric machine and power electronics, and must be balanced with cost goals. ANSYS simulation tools, Fluent and Maxwell, can be used to predict the thermal and electromagnetic performance of these systems, and can therefore be used to optimize design choices for both thermal and cost considerations while meeting all application objectives. Continue reading

5 Improved Workflows for Rotating Machinery Design and Analysis

There have been a number of new and exciting workflow enhancements included in ANSYS 16.0 for those who design and analyze rotating machinery to make data transfers and simulation setup easier. Here are the top five enhancements:

1) BladeGen to BladeEditor

In ANSYS 16.0, it is now possible to load BladeGen data into BladeEditor in Workbench. Users could always link BladeGen to BladeEditor (i.e ImportBGD function) in Workbench, but to perform a LoadBGD command, it was required to go into BladeEditor and find the BladeGen file to load manually. With the Create New > Geometry feature from the BladeGen (right click menu shown below) this process is much easier now. Continue reading