Zyz Sailing Team Designs Using ANSYS

Zys sailing teamZyz sailing team started designing and manufacturing small sailing boats in 2008 to participate to Italian inter-university regattas called 1001velaCUP. During the first eight-year experience of the team, different boats have been launched, trying to optimize all different aspects that influence the final performance of a boat. R3 class rule adopted in this competition imposes geometrical and structural constrains to the design process: maximum length x beam of the boat is 4,60 x 2,10 m, while a minimum percentage weight for the hull constituted by 70% of plant-origin material is imposed. Continue reading

Dependable Composite Design

Determining the applicability and reliability of composite materials can be extremely complex. Engineering layered composites involves many definitions including numerous layers, materials, thicknesses and orientations to predict how well the finished product will perform under real-world working conditions. Simulation can assist you in predicting stresses and deformations as well as a range of failure criteria for composite design. ANSYS Composite PrepPost software provides all necessary functionalities for finite element analysis of layered composites. New capabilities released with ANSYS 17.0 can make to easier to effectively design composites. Continue reading

Constitutive Modeling of 3D Printed FDM Parts: Part 2 (Approaches)

In part 1 of this two-part post, I reviewed the challenges in the constitutive modeling of 3D printed parts using the Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) process. In this second part, I discuss some of the approaches that may be used to enable analyses of FDM parts even in presence of these challenges. I present them below in increasing order of the detail captured by the model. Continue reading

FEA Simplifies the Design of Complex Composite Structures

When I first got introduced to composites as a student (many years ago!), I remember having felt amazed at how powerful yet complex materials they are. In a recent interview published in Composites in Manufacturing, my colleague Marc Wintermantel expressed the challenge of designing composites products very nicely: “When a designer uses simulation software to define composite part points in space they have a tremendous amount of additional design options and parameters to deal with.[…] These options are so large that you need to depend on optimized simulation tools because the computations go way beyond most people’s abilities to perform these tasks by hand”. And indeed, how can an engineer figure out what the optimum stackup is for a given applications with so many possibilities for fabrics thicknesses, orientations or location choices? Steel or aluminum are much easier to deal with! Continue reading